Tag Archives: competition

“Wearing Spurs Means a Cavalry Paratrooper Persevered”

Cavalry paratroopers from the 82nd Airborne Division recently proved themselves worthy to wear spurs.

Cavalry paratroopers assigned to the 82nd Airborne Division ruckmarch to their next lane during a Spur Ride, Tuesday, November 27 on Fort Bragg.

Paratroopers assigned to the 73rd Cavalry Regiment elements in the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and Combat Aviation Brigades of the 82nd Airborne Division conducted a Spur Ride on Fort Bragg in late November, ending in a Spur Ceremony on Wednesday, November 28th.

Two Spur Candidates from the 82nd Airborne Division drag a weighted litter during a lane evaluating their medical knowledge Tuesday, November 26 on Fort Bragg.

“Any day spent under the shade of red and white guidons is a great day,” said Maj. Shawn McNicol, the Executive Officer for 5th Squadron, 73rd Cavalry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division during his opening comments. “However, today is especially significant as we are able to bring together three Squadrons of the 73rd Cavalry Regiment in a single event of comradery and fellowship.”

The tradition of the Spur Ride draws from the heritage of U.S. Cavalry units. When new soldiers arrived to cavalry units, they required extensive training in horsemanship and mounted swordsmanship. These soldiers’ received a horse with a shaved tail, identifying them as a potential hazard and requiring extra space in which to train and operate.

While riding a “shave tail,” new Cavalry soldiers were not permitted to wear spurs, as their undisciplined use would only worsen a problem.

Two Spur Candidates from the 82nd Airborne Division carry a weighted rucksack while moving between evaluation lanes Tuesday, November 26 on Fort Bragg.

Only after extensive training and evaluation proving their skill at maneuvering a horse and wielding a sword would a Cavalry soldier be presented with spurs and his horse be permitted to grow out their shaved tail.

“The modern-day Spur Ride provides a Cavalry paratrooper a true gut-check; the means to do a personal assessment of their grit and determination,” said Lt. Col. Jonathan Hartsock, Commander of 5-73 CAV. “Wearing spurs means a cavalry paratrooper persevered. They were pushed to their physical and mental limits and they emerged victorious.”

Spur candidates, known as “Shave Tails,” underwent the thirty six hour long Spur Ride with minimal opportunity to rest and even less chances to sleep. As temperatures dipped below freezing in the November North Carolina winter, candidates continued to demonstrate their knowledge of Cavalry history, tactics, medical techniques and airborne proficiency.

Staff Sgt. Brittany Wildman, forefront, a paratrooper assigned to the 5th Squadron, 73rd Cavalry Regiment receives her spurs during a Spur Ceremony on Wednesday, November 28th on Fort Bragg.

“As a Cavalry paratrooper, the only thing more memorable than receiving your spurs is placing them on the heel of a candidate you sponsored through their Spur Ride,” continued Hartsock. “The Cavalry community here on Fort Bragg is strong and events like this continue our long and proud history.”

Congratulations to the October Best Squad Winners!

Congratulations to the Panther paratroopers of Company D, 2nd Battalion, 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment on their victory during the October Best Squad Competition held on Fort Bragg!

The 2P paratroopers proved to be tops in a competition testing their physical endurance, mental agility and tactical skills through a series of stations and events.

All American Engineers Honor Valor, Sacrifice of WWII Waal River Crossing

Paratroopers from Company A, forefront, and Company B, rear, compete against each other during the 307th Airborne Engineer Battalion’s commemoration of the 74th anniversary of the Waal River Crossing on Wednesday, October 3, 2018 on Fort Bragg’s McKellar’s Pond. The paratroopers were competing to cross the lake five times in honor of Pfc. Willard Jenkins, killed by enemy fire while manning a rudder during the WWII river assault.

Members of the 82nd Airborne Division recently honored the valor and sacrifice of engineers who valiantly braved fierce enemy fire and artillery to ferry paratroopers across the Waal River during WWII’s Operation Market Garden.

All American Engineers of the 307th Airborne Engineer Battalion commemorated the 74th anniversary of the Waal River Crossing at Fort Bragg’s McKellar’s Lake on Oct. 3, 2018 with espirit de corps and fierce competition.

“This event provides an opportunity to commemorate the sacrifice our fellow engineer brethren of the 307th AEB made during Operation Market Garden on Sept. 20, 1944,” said Maj. Chris Pierce, the battalion’s Executive Officer. “It gives paratroopers a sense of what moving across a body of water while totally exposed to enemy fire is like.”

Wearing WWII-era uniforms and in a boat replicating the type used to cross the Waal River, members of the All American Airborne Legion and paratroopers from the 307th Airborne Engineer Battalion row across Fort Bragg’s McKellar’s Pond on October 3, 2018. The reenactment was part of the battalion’s commemoration of the WWII crossing of the Waal River by 82nd Airborne Division paratroopers under heavy enemy fire.

The Waal River Crossing during WWII was a daring feat; a daytime river crossing to ferry paratroopers of the 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment across 250 yards of moving water with no cover from enemy machine gun fire and artillery. Their objective was the north end of the Nijmegen Bridge; deemed essential if Operation Market Garden was to be successful.

Paratroopers of Company C, 307th Airborne Engineer Battalion would get them across. Three paratroopers manned each collapsible canvas boat with many of the occupants using their rifles to row in the absence of oars. Twenty-six boats departed in the first wave with only eleven of them returning to ferry more paratroopers across.

Paratroopers assigned to the 307th Airborne Engineer Battalion, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division row Zodiac boats across Fort Bragg’s McKellar’s Pond on Wednesday, October 3, 2018 in commemoration of the 74th anniversary of the WWII Waal River Crossing. The paratroopers were competing to cross the lake five times in honor of Pfc. Willard Jenkins, killed by enemy fire while manning a rudder during the river assault.

In all, engineers of the 307th made five trips across the Waal River under heavy fire and the crossing eventually served as inspiration for the 1977 film “A Bridge Too Far.”

The event began at the 307th’s headquarters where companies of the battalion formed up in the early Fort Bragg morning. Racing more than two miles to McKellar’s Pond, each company formed teams that took turns carrying their assigned Zodiac Boat.

After all of the companies arrived, reenactors from the All American Airborne Legion and members of the battalion rowed across the lake in World War II-era uniforms and replicas of the collapsible boats while a narrator read a historical vignette of the river assault.

Paratroopers assigned to the Paratroopers assigned to the 307th Airborne Engineer Battalion, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division begin their competition to cross Fort Bragg’s McKellar’s Pond five times Wednesday, October 3, 2018. The competition was in in commemoration of the 74th anniversary of the WWII Waal River Crossing and held in honor of Pfc. Willard Jenkins, killed by enemy fire while manning a rudder during the river assault.

Paratroopers then loaded into the Zodiacs and competed to be the first to row across McKellar’s Pond, each time delivering a paratrooper to form a five-person team required to sprint around the lake back to the starting point.

The memory of Pfc. Willard “Bud” Jenkins was honored throughout the competition. Jenkins was a paratrooper assigned to the 307th AEB at the time of the WWII Waal River Crossing. Jenkins was reportedly manning a rudder on one of the boats when he was shot in the chest and fell overboard.

Jenkins’ remains were recently identified and he was buried in his hometown of Scranton, Pennsylvania with members of the 307th in attendance to provide him military honors.

“Beastmaster” paratroopers assigned to Company B, 307th Airborne Engineer Battalion, 3rd Brigade Combat Team celebrate their victory during the battalion’s commemoration of the 74th anniversary of the Waal River Crossing. The paratroopers won the annual competition for the second time by being the first in the battalion to row five times across Fort Bragg’s McKellar’s Pond on Wednesday, October 3, 2018.

“Beastmasters” from Company B won the coveted paddle and bragging rights awarded to the victors of the annual competition for the second year in a row.

“The history of this is extremely important that we don’t forget the soldiers that fought against insurmountable odds to seize an objective,” said Capt. Aaron Scherffius, the company commander during his victory remarks.